Tuesday, May 18

Gardening

Home-grown herbs are best for fragrance and flavour
Gardening

Home-grown herbs are best for fragrance and flavour

Every garden needs herbs.Even if you never cook, sage, rosemary and so many other herbs could greatly enrich your planting. Lavenders, thymes and oregano are as pretty and fragrant as the finest garden plants. Home-grown herbs also taste better than supermarket products. Dried herbs could never beat the complex, subtle flavours of fresh parsley, tarragon or basil. Newly chopped spearmint couldn't be less like the sugary gunk in jars. Herbs are easy to grow, especially in a sunny garden. The most common are fully hardy. A few, such as basil and coriander are tender. But they're easy to raise from seed. If you grow basil, you could make and store your own pesto. Sow coriander and you can enjoy the fresh, citrussy leaves. Pretty pink flowers follow, then the uniquely flavoured seeds ripen...
Gardening expert says herbs will rot in ‘double time’ if you don’t follow key drainage tip
Gardening

Gardening expert says herbs will rot in ‘double time’ if you don’t follow key drainage tip

Herbs are a great way to add colour, texture and a pleasant scent to your garden. They’re also a perfect accompaniment to a plethora of summer dishes. However, many Britons believe that you need a garden to grow herbs, but gardening expert Matt James has explained how this isn’t the case. In a 2013 video for Waitrose & Partners, Matt shared how you can plant herbs using bags, baskets and containers. He said the attractive plant bed will see you through the year. While sharing his technique, Matt also shared a “key thing to remember when growing herbs” or risk them rotting more quickly. Matt said: “Herbs aren’t just great for the garden. You can grow them in containers too. “Now obviously you can grow them in individual containers. “Alternatively, how about something like this. C...
A Comprehensive Guide to Oregano: How to Grow, Prune, Dry, and Store the Herb
Gardening

A Comprehensive Guide to Oregano: How to Grow, Prune, Dry, and Store the Herb

Here's how to grow, prune,dry, and store oregano. Oregano is easy to maintainand can be grown inside or out. Be sure to plant your herb in an area withlots of sun for its best chance to flourish. If you live in a naturally warm climate,set your oregano plants up in anarea with some shade. Take your sprouted plants or clippings andspace them 8-to- 10-inches apart, and ensurethat they have well-drained but moist soil. Once your oregano plants reacharound four-inches in height,they're ready to be pruned. Prune oregano using extrasharp kitchen scissors. Dry your herbs by hanging them up withtwine in a shaded area of your home. Read more at Yahoo News.
How Herb Gardening Can Save Home Cooks a Ton of Money
Gardening

How Herb Gardening Can Save Home Cooks a Ton of Money

Spring begins for me when I start planning, preparing, and planting my garden. I live in a duplex and only have space for a narrow raised bed and a few containers, so I have to be deliberate in my plant selection. I'm also not known for my gardening skills; my family looks with pity upon most of the plants I bring home, knowing they probably won't last long. That said, I have found several herbs that even I can keep alive. And the benefits of growing an herb gardenmake these aromatic plants well worth growing: they don't need much room to thrive, you can easily use them in your cooking, and herbs taste so much better when they are fresh-picked. But you may not have considered that an herb garden can also save you money. Read more at Yahoo.
Mistakes You Are Making With Your Kitchen Herb Garden
Gardening

Mistakes You Are Making With Your Kitchen Herb Garden

As people have spent an extended period of time at home this past year during the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, home cooking has become increasingly popular. At the same time, people are trying to limit trips to the grocery store, so it's difficult to stock up on fresh herbs. It can also get expensive very quickly. Using fresh herbs is great, because they add amazing flavor to different foods, and can help bring a dish full-circle. They also make eating at home a little more special. They can kick your meals up a notch both in taste and presentation. Plus, when you're cooking, it's fun to head over to your adorable kitchen herb garden to cut off just what you need. So grow your own herbs right on your kitchen windowsill, and add a bit of sunshine to each plate ... and hopefully your day ...
Gardening expert reveals tip for growing herbs and it costs nothing
Gardening

Gardening expert reveals tip for growing herbs and it costs nothing

There’s nothing better than cutting some fresh cilantro or rosemary from your own garden to enhance your cooking. If you've been thinking of how to create a herb garden in your outdoor space too, we've got a brilliant hack to help get you started. A gardening expert recently shared a tip to help your herbs plant strong roots so they can flourish. The hack costs nothing, as it makes use of the cardboard core of toilet paper to encourage healthy roots. In the latest Grow, Cook, Eat, Arrange podcast episode, garden expert Sarah Raven recommends using the cardboard core of toilet paper to train the roots when planting a herb cutting. ‘I use root trainers or cardboard loo rolls for shrubby herb cuttings like rosemary, thyme and sage,’ she says. Continue at Gardening Etc.
Master Gardener: A garden worth dyeing for – an alternative use of herbs
Gardening

Master Gardener: A garden worth dyeing for – an alternative use of herbs

The diversity of herbs is amazing. The Herb Garden in the Master Gardener complex located at 9020 Airport Road, shows many plants which are commonly known for their use in cooking plus many others that may be deemed useful as medicinal or ornamental herbs. Another fun and fascinating use for herbs, however, is as natural dyes for fabric, paper and beverages. To that end, the Herb group (lovingly known as the Herbies) are in the process of developing a Dye Garden which will contain plants that may be used in dyeing. The art of dyeing using natural plant material has been around since ancient times. Today, folks are trying to use fewer synthetic products and are opting for a natural method. The method of dyeing is a lot of fun, but it does require several steps. Read more at Houston Chroni...
It’s Thyme to Spend Less on Groceries! These 11 Herb Gardens Will Be a Game-Changer
Gardening

It’s Thyme to Spend Less on Groceries! These 11 Herb Gardens Will Be a Game-Changer

If you're curious about growing your own food, investing in a smart herb garden is a great first step. It's not only more sustainable than buying herbs from the grocery store (let's be real, those don't tend to last long), but it's also an eco-friendly solution to food and water waste. All these perks aside, herb gardens double as modern and elevated decor! So go ahead: embrace the trend and channel your inner gardener at the same time with these smart planters. LED Self-Watering Multi-Herb Garden This LED Self-Watering Multi-Herb Garden ($200) makes it super easy to grow the delicious herbs you love, with minimal effort required. More at PopSugar.
How to grow happy herbs, a quick guide by gardening expert Helen Yemm
Gardening

How to grow happy herbs, a quick guide by gardening expert Helen Yemm

Banish from your mind the romantic idea of an “everything under the sun” pretty aromatic jungle that may be the herb garden of your memories or fantasies: most of us have neither the space for such a thing nor the time to maintain it. Here, I aim to provide those who have not successfully grown herbs before with some basics about how to succeed with the most familiar culinary herbs, together with suggestions as to ways to slot some of them into a small garden, even to grow a few cut-and-come-again-everyday herbs together in a convenient place outside the back door, in a courtyard or on a balcony. Unsurprisingly, it is not a question of “one size fits all”, so you need to know something about each herb’s basic needs and growth habits... Continue at the Telegraph.
26 Plants You Should Always Grow Side-By-Side
Gardening

26 Plants You Should Always Grow Side-By-Side

Seasoned gardeners know that a diverse mix of plants makes for a healthy and beautiful garden. Many believe that certain plant combinations have extraordinary (even mysterious) powers to help each other grow. Scientific study of the process, called companion planting, has confirmed that some combinations have real benefits unique to those pairings. Companions help each other grow and use garden space efficiently. Tall plants, for example, provide shade for sun-sensitive shorter plants. Vines can cover the ground while tall stalks grow skywards, allowing two plants to occupy the same patch. Some couplings also prevent pest problems. Plants can repel harmful organisms or lure the bad bugs away from more delicate species. These combinations of plants do way better, together: Roses and G...