Saturday, July 31

Gardening

Mistakes You Are Making With Your Kitchen Herb Garden
Gardening

Mistakes You Are Making With Your Kitchen Herb Garden

As people have spent an extended period of time at home this past year during the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, home cooking has become increasingly popular. At the same time, people are trying to limit trips to the grocery store, so it's difficult to stock up on fresh herbs. It can also get expensive very quickly. Using fresh herbs is great, because they add amazing flavor to different foods, and can help bring a dish full-circle. They also make eating at home a little more special. They can kick your meals up a notch both in taste and presentation. Plus, when you're cooking, it's fun to head over to your adorable kitchen herb garden to cut off just what you need. So grow your own herbs right on your kitchen windowsill, and add a bit of sunshine to each plate ... and hopefully your day ...
Gardening expert reveals tip for growing herbs and it costs nothing
Gardening

Gardening expert reveals tip for growing herbs and it costs nothing

There’s nothing better than cutting some fresh cilantro or rosemary from your own garden to enhance your cooking. If you've been thinking of how to create a herb garden in your outdoor space too, we've got a brilliant hack to help get you started. A gardening expert recently shared a tip to help your herbs plant strong roots so they can flourish. The hack costs nothing, as it makes use of the cardboard core of toilet paper to encourage healthy roots. In the latest Grow, Cook, Eat, Arrange podcast episode, garden expert Sarah Raven recommends using the cardboard core of toilet paper to train the roots when planting a herb cutting. ‘I use root trainers or cardboard loo rolls for shrubby herb cuttings like rosemary, thyme and sage,’ she says. Continue at Gardening Etc.
Master Gardener: A garden worth dyeing for – an alternative use of herbs
Gardening

Master Gardener: A garden worth dyeing for – an alternative use of herbs

The diversity of herbs is amazing. The Herb Garden in the Master Gardener complex located at 9020 Airport Road, shows many plants which are commonly known for their use in cooking plus many others that may be deemed useful as medicinal or ornamental herbs. Another fun and fascinating use for herbs, however, is as natural dyes for fabric, paper and beverages. To that end, the Herb group (lovingly known as the Herbies) are in the process of developing a Dye Garden which will contain plants that may be used in dyeing. The art of dyeing using natural plant material has been around since ancient times. Today, folks are trying to use fewer synthetic products and are opting for a natural method. The method of dyeing is a lot of fun, but it does require several steps. Read more at Houston Chroni...
It’s Thyme to Spend Less on Groceries! These 11 Herb Gardens Will Be a Game-Changer
Gardening

It’s Thyme to Spend Less on Groceries! These 11 Herb Gardens Will Be a Game-Changer

If you're curious about growing your own food, investing in a smart herb garden is a great first step. It's not only more sustainable than buying herbs from the grocery store (let's be real, those don't tend to last long), but it's also an eco-friendly solution to food and water waste. All these perks aside, herb gardens double as modern and elevated decor! So go ahead: embrace the trend and channel your inner gardener at the same time with these smart planters. LED Self-Watering Multi-Herb Garden This LED Self-Watering Multi-Herb Garden ($200) makes it super easy to grow the delicious herbs you love, with minimal effort required. More at PopSugar.
How to grow happy herbs, a quick guide by gardening expert Helen Yemm
Gardening

How to grow happy herbs, a quick guide by gardening expert Helen Yemm

Banish from your mind the romantic idea of an “everything under the sun” pretty aromatic jungle that may be the herb garden of your memories or fantasies: most of us have neither the space for such a thing nor the time to maintain it. Here, I aim to provide those who have not successfully grown herbs before with some basics about how to succeed with the most familiar culinary herbs, together with suggestions as to ways to slot some of them into a small garden, even to grow a few cut-and-come-again-everyday herbs together in a convenient place outside the back door, in a courtyard or on a balcony. Unsurprisingly, it is not a question of “one size fits all”, so you need to know something about each herb’s basic needs and growth habits... Continue at the Telegraph.
26 Plants You Should Always Grow Side-By-Side
Gardening

26 Plants You Should Always Grow Side-By-Side

Seasoned gardeners know that a diverse mix of plants makes for a healthy and beautiful garden. Many believe that certain plant combinations have extraordinary (even mysterious) powers to help each other grow. Scientific study of the process, called companion planting, has confirmed that some combinations have real benefits unique to those pairings. Companions help each other grow and use garden space efficiently. Tall plants, for example, provide shade for sun-sensitive shorter plants. Vines can cover the ground while tall stalks grow skywards, allowing two plants to occupy the same patch. Some couplings also prevent pest problems. Plants can repel harmful organisms or lure the bad bugs away from more delicate species. These combinations of plants do way better, together: Roses and G...
Herb of the Year parsley is easy to grow, right for many foods
Gardening

Herb of the Year parsley is easy to grow, right for many foods

The International Herb Association established National Herb Week in 1991, and every year since 1995 they have chosen an Herb of the Year. The Herb of the Year must fulfill its mandate by being useful in at least two out of three categories: medicinal, culinary or decorative. This year that herb is parsley, Petroselinum crispum, and it qualifies on all counts. Parsley was cultivated as early as the third century BC. The Greeks tied it to their horses before battles to make them impervious to weapons. The Romans used it as a garnish and flavoring and decorated their tables and floors with it to absorb unpleasant odors. Medieval Europeans believed that if you spoke your enemy’s name while plucking a sprig of parsley, your enemy would drop dead. Parsley came to the U.S. with the early sett...
Gardening: Know when and how to use pesticides in your garden
Gardening

Gardening: Know when and how to use pesticides in your garden

Did Santa stock your shed this Christmas? Perhaps a new shovel or shiny hand pruners? There are so many tools we can use to avoid using pesticides, but sometimes you have a decision to make. Like, do I get to eat the broccoli or are the cabbage loopers going to eat it all? I would say one of the most important tools in the shed, if not the most important, is knowledge. Especially when it comes to pesticides. The Trident Technical College horticulture program will be teaching an online pesticides class this spring. At the end of the semester, students are prepared to take the Commercial Applicator license exam. They are required to have a license to legally apply pesticides to a property that is not their own. Keep reading at Post & Courier.
The best herbs to grow in your garden aren’t the ones you use the most. Here’s why.
Gardening

The best herbs to grow in your garden aren’t the ones you use the most. Here’s why.

I recently moved to a new garden; thankfully, it came with a house attached. The garden is small and wildly inclined, so, rather than dive into the challenge, I did what you are always told to do with a garden: leave it be for a year to see what it does, what hidden gems (or otherwise) might lie temporarily unseen, waiting to spring forth. Accordingly, I left the beds alone. Instead, I filled pots with compost and trowels of grit and planted herbs. I may not have grown any vegetables or fruit, but that rectangle near the back door made my summer and changed so many meals for the better. It refreshed my belief that there is nothing better you can grow than herbs: they dress up the staples in delicious clothes, look beautiful, draw beneficial insects into your garden and for a large part —...
Learn to grow herbal tea garden right inside your home
Gardening

Learn to grow herbal tea garden right inside your home

Advertisement of herbal elixirs to herbal drinks has become a common phenomenon these days. From Instagram, Facebook, YouTube, suddenly there has been a lot of conversation about herbal or wellness tea. In fact, various celebrities have also been talking and sharing about their newly found love for these teas. Though tea culture is not new, then why suddenly there's so much discussion about it?  "In these tough times of the pandemic, irrespective of financial or social status, people have learnt the importance of time and self-reliance. The focus has shifted from luxury or extravagance to necessity and something that is easily accessible. There is increased awareness about maintaining good health and improving your immunity, not just to fight a particular virus, but to have a healthy life...